Nine Dieting Myths Busted

We all in our quest to remain fit and healthy watch our diets from time to time. What we don’t really know is if we are following the right diet plans or are we just following myths. So, how much do we really know about diets?
Here are some myths that maybe you never were aware about:

Myth 1) Carbs are Bad

Source: fightfit.cn
Source: fightfit.cn

Fact: First of all, no food is all bad. This myth is based on only one part of the carbohydrate family, simple or refined carbohydrates—sugar, juices and starches such as white rice, white bread, potatoes and pasta. Complex carbs such as fruits, veggies and whole grains are great energy sources and you can eat more without adding a lot of calories. The high fiber content of complex carbs will make you feel more satisfied and not leave you with craving more the way simple carbs do. Just make sure you go easy on packaged foods, soda and fruit juices, pasta and bread, potatoes and white rice.

Myth 2) Certain foods can burn fat

Source:boomboomperformance.com
Source:boomboomperformance.com

Fact: No foods can burn fat. Some foods with caffeine may speed up your metabolism (the way your body uses energy or calories) for a very short time, but they do not cause weight loss.

Myth 3) The more I work out, the more I lose

Source: experiencelife.com
Source: experiencelife.com

Fact: Exercising doesn’t burn out a lot of calories. The only way you can lose weight is to burn more calories than you consume. All physical activity burns calories, even standing, sitting and sleeping. The more vigorous an activity, the more calories burned

Myth 4) Exercise turns fat into muscles.

Source: fitnessinbath.com
Source: fitnessinbath.com

Fact: Fat and muscle tissue are composed of two entirely different types of cells. You burn fat and build muscle. You can lose one and gain another, but fat can never turn into muscle.

Myth 5) Low fat is the way to go

Source: joanlunden.com
Source: joanlunden.com

Fact: Low-fat diets were a huge hit in the 1990s, but today we’re smarter. Fat is filling, enhances taste and supports fat burning; therefore it is necessary for fat loss. Low-fat diets can lead to dry, dull skin and feeling cold easily. Instead of low fat or no-fat eating—be smart about fat. There are “good” fats (i.e., monosaturated and polysaturated fats) and not-so-good fats (i.e., saturated, trans fats). So, eat moderate amounts of healthy fats from avocados, olive oil and nuts, and limit saturated fat from fried food, red meat and butter. Try to stay away from trans fats completely. French fries, packaged baked goods, cookies and crackers are often loaded with them so make sure you put them back in the aisle you picked them from.

Myth 6) Eating late in the evening will make you fat

Source: maxfitnessbend.com
Source: maxfitnessbend.com

Fact: This myth originated because many people eat a lot of snacks and junk food at night before bed, and eating extra calories adds extra kilos. Sure, you may feel better if you don’t go to bed with half-digested pizza in your stomach. But, calories are calories, whether you eat them in the morning, at noon or at night.

Myth 7) Skipping meals is a good way to lose weight

Source: slideshare.net
Source: slideshare.net

Fact: Studies show that people who skip breakfast and eat fewer times during the day tend to be heavier than people who eat a healthy breakfast and eat four or five times a day. This may be because people who skip meals tend to feel hungrier later on, and eat more than they normally would. It may also be that eating many small meals throughout the day helps people control their appetites.
Myth 8) Natural or Herbal weight loss products are healthy and effective

Source: slideshare.net
Source: slideshare.net

Fact: A weight-loss product that claims to be “natural” or “herbal” is not necessarily safe. These products are not usually scientifically tested to prove that they are safe or that they work. Any product that guarantees rapid, permanent weight loss is at best not effective and at worst, dangerous.
Myth 9) “Low-fat” or “fat-free” or “no added sugar” means low calories.

Source: jillianmichaels.com
Source: jillianmichaels.com

Fact: A low-fat or fat-free food is often lower in calories than the same size portion of the full-fat product. But many processed low-fat or fat-free foods have just as many calories as the full-fat version of the same food—or even more calories. They may contain added sugar, flour or starch thickeners to improve flavor and texture after fat is removed. These ingredients add calories and foods labeled “no added sugar” are often sweetened with fruit juice concentrates and end up with the same amount of calories and no better nutritional value than the original. Always read the label carefully.

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